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Summit Team Building

Team Energizer. “Put Your Chef Hat On!”

Here’s a team building activity hi-lite that’s a team energizer and will fill your stomach! 

Gathering around food is a universal language that brings people together. And teams need time to connect and have some fun together alongside their important meeting agendas.

‘Put Your Chef Hat On!’ is a great energizer to compliment and take a break from your team’s meetings. As a competitive challenge, teams compete and complete various challenges to earn resources to create a culinary masterpiece. Creativity and teamwork are required and team marketing presentations on why their dish is the best provide lots of laughs.

Last week, we had the opportunity to work with a small team from iN STUDIO at Langdon Hall. This team may have been small in numbers, but they brought their full team spirit to our Put Your Chef Hat Challenge. I think a few pictures will show you that they really had fun and were fully engaged in the experience.

We partner with many great conference centers and hotels in Southern Ontario and would love the opportunity to bring out the fun and energy in your team. Learn more “Put Your Chef Hat On!” and other team building activities. Contact us to talk to a Summit team member about how we can enhance your next meeting or offsite.

Scott Kress

Scott Kress is an accomplished climber and adventurer. He’s completed the 7 summits and skied to both the North and South Pole. His storytelling based on his adventures is captivating, but what sets Scott apart is his ability to weave his stories together with his 20+ years of leadership and team development education and experience. Scott is the president of Summit Team Building, and is passionate about helping teams grow and companies flourish.

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